Sea and inland navigation ports and freight terminals are faced with growing energy costs and major political and societal pressure in terms of their environmental performance.

Credit: Shutterstock

There are new and stricter air quality standards and regulations coming online, but for the most part today's ports and terminals do not need to be pushed into changing. They understand themselves that there is an economic gain to be had by turning 'green'.

The EU-funded project GREEN EFFORTS ('Green and effective operations at terminals and in ports') is analysing port and terminal processes in detail with a view to developing new solutions  while promoting the use of cleaner energy at container, roll-on roll-off (ro-ro) and inland  terminals.

With goods transport responsible for about 30 percent of the  caused by humans, GREEN EFFORTS is considering the increased use of renewable energies, as well as efforts to get port and terminal personnel actively involved in . The project will also examine the possibility of using  (LNG), as well as shore-based power for berthed ships to reduce  in ports.

Led by researchers at Jacobs University Bremen, GREEN EFFORTS will develop methods and standards aimed at the reduction of carbon footprints at ports and terminals. Importantly, all results will be described in a clear and comprehensible way to foster easy application.

More of the story, click image