The US-European Asteroid Impact and Deflection mission (AIDA) involves sending two small spacecraft to study and smash into the binary asteroid Didymos. The impact should change the pace at which the objects spin around each other. Credit: ESA

Planetary Defense is a concept very few people heard of or took seriously – that is until last week's humongous and totally unexpected meteor explosion over Russia sent millions of frightened residents ducking for cover, followed just hours later by Earth's uncomfortably close shave with the 45 meter (150 ft) wide asteroid named 2012 DA14.

This 'Cosmic Coincidence' of potentially catastrophic space rocks zooming around Earth is a wakeup call that underscores the need to learn much more about the ever present threat from the vast array of unknown celestial debris in close proximity to Earth and get serious about Planetary Defense from asteroid impacts.

The European Space Agency's (ESA) proposed Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment mission, or AIDA, could significantly bolster both our basic knowledge about asteroids in our neighborhood and perhaps even begin testing Planetary Defense concepts and deflection strategies.

After two years of work, research teams from the US and Europe have selected the mission's target – a so called 'binary asteroid' named Didymos – that AIDA will intercept and smash into at about the time of its closest approach to Earth in 2022 when it is just 11 million kilometers away.

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